SCHEDULE

Next week’s schedule, including homework and reading assignments and all relevant deadlines, will be posted here by 5 p.m. every Friday.

Dec. 5-end of the semester

The final version of your trend story is due by noon Monday, Dec. 7. Write the final version in the same Google doc you used for the draft, then re-share the doc with me when you’re finished. Do not email me your story.  Include a link to your multimedia element AT THE BOTTOM OF YOUR STORY (please don’t embed it within the story, because it makes it harder to measure your word count).  Remember to list the contact information for your sources in the doc (see details in the syllabus). If you are doing a video story, send me an email with links to your video story and your multimedia element and contact information for your sources.

Homework

  • Because I want you to focus on your trend story this weekend, I’ve decided to do something different for the last homework assignment. Bring your smartphones/video cameras to Chuck E. Cheese’s on Tuesday. You’ll need to gather B-roll and audio clips from at least two different people (yes, these can be and likely will be your classmates). Then post a 45- to 60-second video story, complete with captions and voiceovers as needed, to the Grady Sports YouTube channel by noon Wednesday, Dec. 9. Please note this homework assignment is worth two points.

Also, we have one last online discussion exercise (only one post, due by 11:59 p.m. Sunday, Dec. 6).

———————-

Nov. 21-Dec. 4

Update your portfolio page and send me a link by noon Tuesday, Dec. 1. I am happy to answer any questions you have about portfolio pages between now and then. We will review your portfolio pages during class on Dec. 2. Your portfolio page, and your presentation of it to the class, is worth 5 percent of your overall grade.

Reading (to be completed before the start of class on Monday, Nov. 30)

  • Rolling Thunder, Lee Jenkins, Sports Illustrated, Oct. 25, 2010
    • Jenkins will be joining us via Skype during our Nov. 30 class. Those of you in the first half of the alphabet by last name (Ainslie through Hansey) will be asking him questions as if you’re doing a profile. Those of you in the last half of the alphabet (Hill through Spencer) will be asking him questions as if you’re writing a story about storytelling techniques and you’re seeking his input and experience. You should have at least three questions prepared for the conversation.

No homework this week.

No online discussion this week.

———————-

Nov. 14-20

CREATE A GOOGLE DOC containing your trend story draft/storyboard and share it with me by midnight Thursday, Nov. 19. Do not email me your story. The slug (file name) should be in this format: [YourLastName]_TrendStory_MultiFall2015. The draft should reflect that you have interviewed AT LEAST TWO SOURCES (remember that you must have six total for your final version). It can be a detailed outline or storyboard (if you’re doing a video story) or a draft of your full story. Whatever format you choose, it should spell out the “why now” and “why should I care” and detail what you’re planning to write/say in your lede and your nut graf. At the top of the doc, YOU MUST TELL ME WHAT YOU’RE PLANNING FOR YOUR MULTIMEDIA ELEMENT.

The 10th (and final) team blogs/podcasts should be posted by noon Friday, Nov. 20. Instructions for the blogs are on the main Coverage Teams page.

Textbook readings (to be completed before the start of class on Monday, Nov. 16)

  • Blaine/Chapter 13, “Collecting Details: Seeing B-Roll and the Stuff of Stories” AND Chapter 29, “Place Description” AND Chapter 30, “Setting a Scene” AND Chapter 31, “Action and Sequence”

No homework this week.

Also, don’t forget about the online discussion exercise (only one post, due by 11:59 p.m. Sunday, Nov. 15).

———————-

Nov. 7-13

The budget line and a list of possible sources for your trend story are due to me, via email, by midnight Wednesday, Nov. 11.

The ninth team blogs/podcasts should be posted by noon Friday, Nov. 13. Instructions for the blogs are on the main Coverage Teams page.

Textbook readings (to be completed before the start of class on Wednesday, Nov. 11)

  • Briggs/Chapter 7, “Telling stories with video”
  • Blaine/Chapter 9, “Conventions” AND Chapter 10, “Where You Stand: Framing” AND Chapter 11, “Where You Stand: Lighting” AND Chapter 12, “Where You Stand: Wide-Medium-Close”

Homework (due by 11:59 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 12)

  • Take at least 20 photos of a person you know well. Ideally, this is the same person you described for the metaphor/simile exercise. But if you need to use someone else, that’s fine. You are aiming for photos that reveal at least a slice of that person’s identity, story and/or character. You’ll do this through photos that capture setting, telling details, moments and emotion. Do not take posed photos. You want to capture these people in natural environments and spontaneous moments. You’ll want a few wide and medium shots, but most of these should be close-ups (make sure you complete the assigned textbook readings for this week before you begin). You’ll likely have to take several photos initially to get the person comfortable with not changing what they’re doing just because you’re taking a photo. Choose your six to 10 best. Then build and post a slideshow on the Photo Slideshows page on the class web site. Make sure you include captions, the first of which should include your name in a photo credit (i.e. “Joe Smith bites into a Mama’s Boy biscuit./Photo by Vicki Michaelis”). Be aware that you won’t be able to do this in one hour on one day. Plan accordingly.

Also, don’t forget about the online discussion exercise (only one post, due by 11:59 p.m. Sunday, Nov. 8).

———————-

Oct. 31-Nov. 6

The final version of your second story is due by midnight Thursday, Nov. 5. Write the final version in the same Google doc you used for the draft, then re-share the doc with me when you’re finished. Do not email me your story.  Include a link to your multimedia element AT THE BOTTOM OF YOUR STORY (please don’t embed it within the story, because it makes it harder to measure your word count).  Remember to list the contact information for your sources in the doc (see details in the syllabus). If you are doing a video story, send me an email with links to your video story and your multimedia element and contact information for your sources.

The eighth team blogs/podcasts should be posted by noon Friday, Nov. 6. Instructions for the blogs are on the main Coverage Teams page.

Reading (to be completed before the start of class on Monday, Nov. 2)

  • Two Weeks in New York: Behind the scenes of Serena Williams’s historic Grand Slam bid — and ultimate collapse, John Branch and Todd Heisler, The New York Times, Sept. 11, 2015
    • Each of you needs to be prepared to talk about a specific aspect of this article in Monday’s class. Make sure you have several examples ready, so that you can add something different to the conversation than the others in your group. The assignments are as follows:
      • Ainslie, Chrzanowski, Crafton, Giambalvo: the evidence of special access, in both the text and photos
      • Greenberg, Greenwood, Hansey, Hill: the telling details, in both the text and photos
      • Hubbard, Marseille, McLanahan: the stories the photos illustrate
      • Nguyen, Saffo, Spencer: how the photos add to the overall narrative

No homework this week. 

No online discussion this week.

———————-

Oct. 24-30

CREATE A GOOGLE DOC containing your profile draft/storyboard and share it with me by midnight Monday, Oct. 26. Do not email me your story. The slug (file name) should be in this format: [YourLastName]_SecondStory_MultiFall2015. The draft should reflect that you have interviewed at least two sources. It can be a detailed outline or storyboard (if you’re doing a video story) or a draft of your full story. Whatever format you choose, it should spell out the “why now” and “why should I care” and detail what you’re planning to write/say in your lede and your nut graf. At the top of the doc, you must tell me what you’re planning for your multimedia element.

No team blogs/podcasts due this week.

Homework (due via email to me by 11:59 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 29)

  • Describe your favorite food or meal in 150 words, using no personal pronouns and a maximum of two “to be” verbs. Your writing should appeal to the senses of both taste and smell. Your sentences should be simply constructed: subject, verb, object.

Also, don’t forget about the online discussion exercise (only one post, due by 11:59 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 25).

———————-

Oct. 17-23

The seventh team blogs should be posted by noon Friday, Oct. 23. Instructions for the blogs are on the main Coverage Teams page.

Reading (to be completed before the start of class on Wednesday, Oct. 14)

  • Briggs textbook/Chapter 5, “Visual storytelling with photographs”

No homework assignment this week.

Also, don’t forget about the online discussion exercise (first post due by 11:59 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 18; feedback by 11:59 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 20).

———————-

Oct. 10-16

The budget line and a list of possible sources for your second story are due to me, via email, by midnight Monday, Oct. 12.

The sixth team blogs should be posted by noon Friday, Oct. 16. Instructions for the blogs are on the main Coverage Teams page.

Reading (to be completed before the start of class on Wednesday, Oct. 14)

  • Briggs textbook/Chapter 9, “Building a digital audience for news”
  • Dreams of a Father, Elizabeth Merrill, ESPN The Magazine, Oct. 7, 2015 (watch the interview with Jerome Bettis also)
    • Each of you needs to be prepared to talk about a specific aspect of the Merrill article in Wednesday’s class. Make sure you have several examples ready, so that you can add something different to the conversation than the others in your group. The assignments are as follows:
      • Ainslie, Chrzanowski, Crafton, Giambalvo: the use of anecdotes
      • Greenberg, Greenwood, Hansey, Hill, Hubbard: the most impactful telling details
      • Marseille, McLanahan, Nguyen, Saffo, Spencer: the various sources interviewed and consulted

No homework assignment this week.

Also, don’t forget about the online discussion exercise (only one post, due by 11:59 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 11).

———————-

Oct. 3-9

The fifth team blogs should be posted by noon Friday, Oct. 9. Instructions for the blogs are on the main Coverage Teams page.

Reading (to be completed before the start of class on Monday, Oct. 5)

  • Briggs textbook/Chapter 8, “Data-driven journalism and digitizing your life”

Homework (bring to class on Wednesday, Oct. 7)

  • Find a set of statistics or other data on your beat that tell a story. You will use these statistics or data to create an infographic during an in-class exercise. Click through the links listed under Infographics/Data Visualization on the Resources page to see what infographics tools we will be using. Those should give you an idea of what kind of numbers or data would work. Note: If you are on the high schools team, choose statistics/data related to the NFL, since reliable high school information can be hard to find.

Also, don’t forget about the online discussion exercise (initial comments due by 11:59 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 4; feedback by 11:59 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 6).

———————-

Sept. 26-Oct. 2

The final version of your profile final is due by midnight Wednesday, Sept. 30. Write the final version in the same Google doc you used for the draft, then re-share the doc with me when you’re finished. Do not email me your story. Remember to list the contact information for your sources in the doc (see details in the syllabus).

The fourth team blogs should be posted by noon Friday, Oct. 2. Instructions for the blogs are on the main Coverage Teams page.

Online readings (to be completed before the start of class on Monday, Sept. 28)

No homework assignment this week.

Also, don’t forget about the online discussion exercise (comments due by 11:59 p.m. Sunday, Sept. 27; feedback by 11:59 p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 29).

———————-

Sept. 19-25

CREATE A GOOGLE DOC containing your profile draft/storyboard and share it with me by midnight Monday, Sept. 21. Do not email me your story. The slug (file name) should be in this format: [YourLastName]_Profile_MultiFall2015. The draft should reflect that you have interviewed at least three sources. It can be a detailed outline or storyboard (if you’re doing a video story) or a draft of your full story. Whatever format you choose, it should spell out the “why now” and “why should I care” and give a sense of what you’re planning to write/say in your lede and your nut graf. 

The third team blogs should be posted by noon Friday, Sept. 25. Instructions for the blogs are on the main Coverage Teams page.

Textbook readings (to be completed before doing the homework assignment, below)

  • Blaine textbook/ Chapter 27, “Relevant Detail” and Chapter 28, “Physical Description”

Homework (due to me via email by midnight Thursday, Sept. 24)

  • Write a 100-word description of your roommate/best friend/significant other/boss. Describe their telling characteristics. Use at least one metaphor, one simile and, at most, two “to be” verbs. No cliches. Nothing “cute.” Use simple ideas and sentences. Write these as if you’re using them in a journalistic profile about these people. Before you begin, read at least one Jim Murray column, such as this one. He was a master of description and metaphor.

Also, don’t forget about the online discussion exercise (comments due by 11:59 p.m. Sunday, Sept. 20; feedback by 11:59 p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 22).

———————-

Sept. 12-18

The second team blogs should be posted by noon Friday, Sept. 18. Instructions for the blogs are on the main Coverage Teams page.

Before the start of class Monday, Sept. 14, review last week’s textbook readings as well as your prep for discussion of the Wright Thompson story you read last week. 

Also, before the start of class Monday, Sept. 14, prepare questions for a group interview with me. Do research as if you’ve been assigned to produce a profile on me. Based on your research, have specific questions and/or topics outlined. Keep in mind that a primary goal you should have when producing a profile is to explore an angle that has not been fully explored already by another outlet. We’ll do this interview session during class Monday.

Readings/listenings (to be completed before the start of class on Wednesday, Sept. 16 or before you do the homework assignment, whichever comes first) 

  • Briggs textbook/Chapter 6, “Making Audio Journalism Visible”
  • Blaine textbook/Chapter 14, “Collecting Details: Listening for Natural Sound” AND Chapter 22, “Shut up” AND Chapter 23, “Body Language” AND Chapter 24, “Location” AND Chapter 25, “Quotes” AND Chapter 26, “Anecdotes”
  • Africa’s Soccer Tourney Takes Guinea’s Mind Off Ebola,” Ofeibea Quist-Arcton, NPR, Jan. 20, 2015  (read the text version of the story while you’re listening and note what the audio adds to the story)
  • 7 Chaotic Hours Behind the Scenes At NFL RedZone, Becky Sullivan, NPR, Dec. 14, 2014 (note how the story mixes in the voices and what’s happening in the studio)

Homework (due by the start of class on Monday, Sept. 21; you do not need to send or post this; just have the raw audio available to work with in class on the 21st)

  • Team up with at least one other person on your coverage team (the five-person teams each will have a group of three). Go to a sports practice or event related to your beat and collect at least 20 minutes of audio, through both natural sound and interviews, that, when edited, will tell a two- to four-minute audio story. You should talk to at least three different people. I recommend short interviews so that you can work easily with the audio.

Because of the heavy reading load, no online discussion exercise this week.

———————-

Sept. 5-11

The budget line and a list of possible sources for your profile are due to me, via email, by midnight Thursday, Sept. 10.

The first team blogs should be posted by noon Friday, Sept. 11. Instructions for the blogs are on the main Coverage Teams page.

Online reading (to be completed before the start of class on Wednesday, Sept. 9)

  • Unity With The Universe, Wright Thompson, ESPN.com, July 17, 2013
    • Each of you needs to be prepared to talk about a specific aspect of the Thompson article in Wednesday’s class. Make sure you have several examples ready, so that you can add something different to the conversation than the others in your group. The assignments are as follows:
      • Ainslie, Chrzanowski, Crafton, Giambalvo: the most impactful telling details
      • Greenberg, Greenwood, Hansey: the various sources interviewed and consulted
      • Hill, Hubbard, Marseille: the dialogue (bits of conversation) used to advance the storyline
      • McLanahan, Nguyen, Saffo, Spencer: the place descriptions

Textbook readings (to be completed before the start of class on Wednesday, Sept. 9). I know this looks like a lot, but it’s only 16 pages total.

  • Blaine textbook/Chapter 15, “Talking to Real People” AND Chapter 16, “Talking to the Right People” AND Chapter 17, “Asking for an Interview” AND Chapter 18, “Talking to Multiple People” AND Chapter 19, “Preparing Questions,” Chapter 20, “Taking Notes and Recording,” AND Chapter 21, “Rhythm”

No homework this week.

Also, don’t forget about the online discussion exercise (to be completed by 11:59 p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 8).

———————-

Aug. 29-Sept. 4

Textbook readings (to be completed by the start of class on Wednesday, Sept. 2)

  • Briggs/Chapter 2, “Blogging and microblogging: Publish, Distribute and Connect”
  • Blaine/Chapter 1, “The Digital Notebook”; Chapter 2, “Why Do I Care?”; Chapter 3, “Thinking Multi-platform”

Homework (due to me via email by 5 p.m. Friday, Sept. 4)

  • You will prepare a beat report that covers all the categories outlined below. The report should be about your primary beat (the one for which you are the lead reporter). For those of you on high school beats, focus on the football team for this assignment. Completing this assignment will require you to research what’s been written about the team, to look through media guides, and to talk with SIDs and/or coaches. You can complete this in list or narrative format. The categories:
    • Team record this season, if applicable (include both overall record and conference record):
    • Team record last season:
    • Key upcoming competitions/games, and/or tournaments during this semester, with dates:
    • Quick wrap of last season (e.g. team went winless in conference; lost three starters to injury; coach fired; etc.):
    • How long has current coach been with this team:
    • Last time this team won a national/state/conference title, whichever are applicable:
    • Two to three key players this season, with a sentence about each:
    • Two to three key players last season, with a sentence about each:
    • Two to three key statistics (team or individual) this season, if applicable:
    • Two to three key statistics (team or individual) last season:
    • Two to three big storylines this season (e.g. team defending national title; new coach; all new starters; team undefeated in conference; etc.):
    • Two to three big storylines last season (see above):

Also, don’t forget about the online discussion exercise (to be completed by 11:59 p.m. Sunday, Aug. 30).

—————

Aug. 23-28

Online reading (to be completed by the start of class on Monday, Aug. 24)

  • “The Jockey,” Barry Bearak and Chang W. Lee, The New York Times, 2013 (Make sure you have your volume turned up as you scroll through this story. Watch all the videos from beginning to end. Be ready to talk about this in class.)

Textbook readings (to be completed by the start of class on Wednesday, Aug. 26)

  • Blaine/Introduction
  • Briggs/Foreword, Preface and Introduction

Homework (due to me via email by midnight Tuesday, Aug. 25)

  • Write a 250-word description of a room in your Athens home that gives the reader insight into who you are through telling details. The description should not contain any personal pronouns (I, me, my, mine) or any second-person references (e.g. “As you walk into the room…”). You should not, however, write about yourself in the third person. The description can contain a maximum of three “to be” verbs (is, are, was, were, be, being, been). Do not just list everything in the room (e.g. “In the corner, a trash can sits. On the wall, posters hang.”). Instead, focus on the things that tell the reader specifically about you.

Also, don’t forget about the online discussion exercise (to be completed by 11:59 p.m. Sunday, Aug. 23).

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s